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Doubles Diving - Which course did you take?

Discussion in 'DIR Diving' started by Samantha CoolBeans, Jul 25, 2017.

  1. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    As Barry said, no caps in SDP. I know Tel describes that is how the briefing goes in the buddy check.

    Not sure why you feel a couple of cylinders and a bunch of US cave protocols are the best solution for the UK.

    As a twinset instructor I feel you might find the BSAC twinset course useful as it covers a wide range of twinset options, rather fixating on one, and might show the diversity of configuration actually in use.
     
  2. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    For me I don't need another system as the one I have works just fine. What I really like about the DIR/Hogarthian system is it's prescriptive nature -- other people far more skilled than me have developed that system.

    However... there's a few minor changes that are sometimes required depending on the "mission". For example the loop in a harness to facilitate in-water doffing and donning when diving from a RIB; helmet mounted lights when diving in confined spaces, additional RH 'D' ring if diving with multiple stages.

    But for general purpose bimbling; why change a great system?

    Oh, must we speak of the longhose? What an innovation; I can breathe from it whilst my kit's being lifted onto the boat; I can donate it and we have space to be able to get ourselves sorted; it's always sitting on my right -- never floats off behind me (and if it does, the hose is in front of me -- that 'sweep' move is bloody awful); my backup is always under my neck; the donate is so easy and effective -- straight into your gob where you most need it. I could and will happily go on... And yes, it's also useful if exiting through a restriction (I think that's the main thing it's known for).
     
  3. furryman

    furryman hmmmm
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    I think it's the effect of the "lost week" on the South Coast, due to the wind.

    Where are the Cheeky Girls?
     
  4. Tribal Chestnut

    Tribal Chestnut Active Member
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    Well, @Samantha CoolBeans, you seem to have let the genie out of the bottle with this thread!

    I'm a diving baby, especially when compared to all the wizened old sods on here, but have been diving with a twinset since around 50 dives.

    I spent a day with a(n ex?) GUE Bod called Garf and @Andy Stevenson last year to get the initial setup/fit spot-on and look at a few other skills, followed by further practice with some of the helpful folk on here and my local BSAC club.

    I've subsequently completed GUE fundies, and the BSAC 'advanced' twinset course, but they were to improve my skills and give me a little more certified depth/accelerated deco respectively.


    In answer to @Dave Whitlow, I'm away next week and won't be diving.
     
  5. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    A week? Have you seen the forecast? We've not made any plans for the weekend and the planned week of dives looks uncertain.
     
  6. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    Oh dear. I think you just answered that. So it need changing? Maybe talk to @Tel and arrange a twinset course to explore ways of over-coming those limitations? :D
     
  7. Big Joe

    Big Joe Active Member

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    I'm pleased I'm just a fat old single tank recreational diver who has the odd few minutes deco when there is plenty of gas left in the tank. I enjoy my diving. Happy to accept the limits that I have put on myself. No ambitions to be a dive god. I resemble a god, but unfortunately it's Bhudda. I quite enjoy watching the angst that all of you experts get your knickers in a twist over who is best, Numbers wise, I suspect that there is a lot more divers like me out ther than the people who populate this forum. Just saying. Thank you for the entertainment.
     
  8. timmyg

    timmyg Super Moderator
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    I agree, this is total entertainment, but also kind of sad when there's personal attacks, and kinda affirms why I, and probably a few others, are now posting less & less. Everyone is the worlds expert on everything.

    In singles I started off with 3 different BCDs & traditional AS before moving into a wing & Primary Donate.

    In twins I've had bungees wings, harnesses with breaks, stuffed hoses etc... & I've pictures of me in kit that I'd rather didn't surface. Now I dive in a DIR/GUE/standard rig (whatever you want to call it)

    Any equipment choice is what works for you. And in a class, as long as it doesn't break standards it's fine. Of course I will always point out areas that I would change & why, but unless it breaks standards why be a mini-hitler.

    Let's all be happy & go diving.

    TG

    Sent from my iPhone using timmytalk
     
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  9. timmyg

    timmyg Super Moderator
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    Shit, when did I become the sensible one?


    TG

    Sent from my iPhone using timmytalk
     
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  10. Dave Whitlow

    Dave Whitlow Well-Known Member

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    Good to hear the majority view and keep enjoying the diving you do. After all, that is what diving is about :)
     
  11. Andy Stevenson

    Andy Stevenson Administrator

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    To be fair, Garf did the hard work, I was his safety diver. It's a good point though, a days coaching with your favourite instructor may well be your best bet. Most of the GUE guys offer one to one individual days.

    Sent from my SM-T280 using Tapatalk
     
  12. Samantha CoolBeans

    Samantha CoolBeans New Member

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    haha TBH I'm learning a fair bit from this thread, I originally thought that a diving twin-set just makes things safer by having more air and just improves trim, I'm reading between the lines and I'm realising that trim has nothing to do with it and that diving doubles is probably going to kill me. :p

    As a noob, it appears that Twin-sets are deemed as 'high-end / tech' diving, but i don't understand why. When i started diving i told my dad about everything and showed him the setup i'd purchased and he warned me all about the 'dangers of diving with a BCD as they were high end and very technical'... He used to dive 50 years ago when these weren't used and it took me quite a bit of time and effort to persuade him that actually once you've had the training they are safer than diving without one.

    So provided you get training and understand everything, Why should diving a twin-set be dangerous?

    ^^^ This ^^^
    'You don't know what you don't know' until someone better (i.e. an instructor) shows you the error of your ways.
    A lot of people will tell you to disregard things you read on the internet as hearsay but if one has the intelligence, common sense and general ability to analyse a situation the internet can actually teach you a pretty great overview of things.

    In my case i had no idea about DIR / Hogarthian setups until i read a bunch of things on the internet.
    Now i understand the rationale behind pretty much every hose length, all the routings, all the concepts behind this method of diving... It makes sense to me.
     
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  13. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    Yes there is info on this thread but also a lot of personal opinion so take some of this stuff with a pinch of salt.

    I guess it depends where you are coming from. When most people move from a single cylinder to a twinset they do it for a particular reason, typically because they need more gas because they are diving deeper/longer, this doesn't seem to be the case for you so it doesn't sound like you really have a reason to need a twinset.

    Diving a twinset isn't really any more dangerous than a single (Apart from being bad for your knees when lifting it) but you should know how to do shutdowns in order to benefit from the increased redundancy.
     
  14. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    All entry level courses are single cylinder non-deco and on many second level the same applies even if going to 30m etc.
    While it's possible to go into deco with say a 15lt, it's limited, so what's required is more gas and as deeper/longer also
    needs redundancy, a twinset is the way to go.

    That puts a line in the sand between rec and tec, so a single historically was seen as rec and a twinset tec.
    High-end? No not really, the line has now moved and instead that distinction is more open circuit vs rebreather .

    Is a twinset dangerous? Well no, it's not the system that's dangerous, but the change of system. With almost
    every element different it needs respect when doing the change. For some that means a decent course others
    a ;long-process of practice. As long as the work is put in it's fine, but a remarkably large number of divers
    going twins do neither and it's this group that some of us try to educate.

    For every diver that is genuinely looking at expanding there diving and is prepared to put in the work there is
    (usually) a middle-aged man going through a mid-life crisis who had a choice between buying more scuba kit or
    getting something 1200cc on two wheels :)
     
  15. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    Twinsets aren't dangerous per-se, aside from the extra weight. They offer greater redundancy and resilience as well as greater gas volumes.

    However, you only get the resilience if you know how to use it. Hence shutdowns, etc. These take a while to learn and practice, but aren't particularly difficult for most people (some struggle to reach back).

    I've only dived with twinsets since I did Fundies. Actually, it's singles on holiday, but the rig -- Hogarthian -- is exactly the same for a single as a twinset.
     
  16. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

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    As a middle-aged man who worked his way up from 500cc to 1300cc on two wheels between 50 and 60+, I take objection Tel. Age is only a number for us baby-boomers.:whistling: During that period, I had some sort or training or guided riding every two years. The main danger for two cylinders or two wheels is not enough use - I biked through the year and always cringed in Spring when the sports bike boys brought out their shiny monsters from their Winter quarters - fortunately, the bikes are so capable, they can overcome a lot of poor riding.
     
  17. Tel

    Tel Super Moderator
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    So I take it you are not a Bambi then and more a BBB (baby-boom biker) :)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4208163.stm
     
  18. JohnL

    JohnL Well-Known Member

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    That article was from 2005, I wasn't even 60 then! I'd say that I was POD (professional old biker) I used the bike to get to my clients, usually 100+ miles on a Monday sparrow-fart and return on Friday afternoon. I used to while away the journeys by seeing how long I could go without braking or stopping - anticipation is a life-saving skill on two wheels. I rarely scared myself and the nearest I got to injury was when a van suddenly turned right on a wet evening in London when I was overtaking it. Very lucky to squeeze past the front with the loss of a footrest and a heavily bruised leg - I shouldn't have been passing him, he should have looked in his mirrors. I sold the last one when I stopped working.
     

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