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equipment to clean underside of boat.

Discussion in 'New to Scuba Diving' started by RPP, Mar 16, 2021.

  1. RPP

    RPP New Member

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    Hi All,
    I need some advice , I am not a scuba diver. I am 67 years old and have missed the boat. I should have taken the courses years ago.
    I want to clean the hull of my 43ft boat. I have a mask, snorkel, fins and weight belt. My plan was to use a 12L cylinder in the cockpit with a 10 metre hose. What other equipment do I need?
    Thanks in anticipation.

    RPP
     
  2. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    Short answer is a regulator system comprising of a first and second stage but you'll want some form or pressure gauge in the cabin too to check how full your cylinder is before you jump in the water. This does have a few risks with it so be careful and don't stay in for too long at first so you can get an idea of how quickly you go through the gas.

    Don't hold your breath too as even though you won't be going that deep lung overexpansion injuries can be quite east to come by.
     
  3. NickPicks

    NickPicks Super Moderator

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    My dad and I used to clean the bottom of the boat by mooring it to the piles on the Hamble public hard next to the Royal Southern Yacht club, waiting for the tide to go out, scrubbing the bottom, then waiting for the tide to come in again.
     
  4. splinter

    splinter Active Member

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    Get in touch with any local dive clubs and see if you can get volunteers. The club I'm in frequently scrubs hulls for a contribution to club funds. I've done it myself a couple of times.

    https://www.bsac.com/club-life/find-a-bsac-club/ link to find local clubs

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
     
    Iain Denham likes this.
  5. jb2cool

    jb2cool Moderator
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    You need to be careful, that sounds like an "at work" situation to me as you are doing work for reward (club reward, not personal reward).
     
  6. Wibble

    Wibble Fish don't talk
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    There's a type of "surface supplied breathing gas compressor" called a "Hookah" which sounds like this could fit the bill. They're frequently advertised on eBay and the like with a lowish pressure compressor with a long hose and regulator.

    In scuba terms, not sure where you could get a very long hose that would sit between the 1st stage on the cylinder and the second stage in your mouth. The longest standard hose is 7 feet / 2.1m.

    Regarding this job, it's a bit awkward as you will be floating free and there's not much to grab on to under a boat so you could push against a brush/scraper. You'd need some weights to help you sink as a wetsuit's quite floaty. Probably you'd need to run a mooring warp under the keel to hold on and give some purchase. If there's not much tide then it would get hard to see under the boat as the gunge fills the water.

    For what it's worth, weed tends to grow only at the top and anywhere with angles that it can attach to such as the keel and stern gear. Often a pressure washer can be used with a longish hose and wand to blast off the weed around the top foot or so of the boat, probably from a dinghy.

    The sailor's answer to not lifting out is a drying mooring over a tide, leaning against scrubbing posts. Obviously depends upon the keel, so not for all boats.

    As a longer term answer, having a scuba set on board could be good for other things such as retrieving things from Neptune's Locker, retrieving ground tackle, etc. It needs a bit of training - mainly to assemble the kit and make sure it works, checking gas pressure, etc. This could be literally a day in some warm place in the Med where you do a "Discover Scuba Diving" day. The big challenge is that scuba kit is surprisingly fragile and wouldn't take to being stowed in a damp locker for long periods. Regulators need to be kept dry, tanks need filling and need "testing" periodically in order to get them filled, unless you have a scuba compressor. It's a minor 'mare with loads of national rules in that place called "abroad".
     

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